Content table

  1. The knees that move us
  2. Sprains and tears
  3. The most common knee injuries
  4. Risk Factors
  5. Preventing knee injuries

The knees that move us

Life is fluidity and movement. Our body sustains, advances and stops thanks to the joints formed by bones, muscles, cartilages and tendons of our locomotive apparatus. What is no doubt that to move we need the joints, and especially the two knees.

The knee and its normal functioning is due to the good condition of the structure of the bones that form this articulation but fundamentally to the good functioning of the 4 major ligaments: anterior cruciate, medial collateral posterior cross and collateral Side.

Sprains and tears

Sprain or kink occurs when the ligament that connects two or more bones is torn or understretched. Sprains cause pain, inflammation, limit or impede movement of the joint and usually leave bruised the injured area. Sprains usually occur from falls that cause severe kinks or sudden flexiones of the joint.

Tearing, bloating, or muscle jerking occurs when the muscle or tendon that binds the muscle to the bone has been forced to excessive stretching or has broken its union with the bone. His symptoms are inflammation of the affected tissues, muscular contractions and cramps, which causes pain and hinders or impedes the movement of the joint.

The tear usually occurs from lifting heavy objects without proper preparation, insufficient heating or relapse in a lesion that has not been treated properly or has not been given enough time to reestablish.

The most common knee injuries

The knee sprain is the most common lesion and affects the anterior cruciate ligament (LCA), representing 50% of the ligamentous lesions of the knee, producing 75% during sports activities, and affecting in greater proportion to women than to men [i] when the doctor asks the patients, 40% say they have felt a dry noise and then an internal pain in the area accompanied by inflammation.

The severity of the knee sprains is determined by the traumatologists according to the width of the tear. If the lesion affects one third of the ligament fibre set, it is grade I. If the break reaches two thirds of the ligament Fibrs is considered grade II. When the rupture reaches the entire ligament is considered serious and qualifies as grade III.

Meniscus lesions are common among knee conditions and affect this cartilage, a crescent-shaped disk whose function is to give stability to the Joint and act as a buffer. These lesions may be due to three main causes:

Traumatic, an impact or strong pressure in the area. Also by sudden twists of the knee, especially if you load weight.

Mechanics, usually by incorrect postures that are perpetuated in time and end up conditioning their correct functioning.

Degenerative, which are produced by a progressive deterioration over time.

Fractures or fissures of the knee bones are usually the most painful and delicate lesions, especially if they are located on the kneecap. Fractures can have their origin in a collision with a strong impact.

The specialists point out that this type of injury usually originates in traffic accidents or in sports practice, but also the fractures can be caused by the weakening of the bones affected by osteoporosis.

According to expert Javier Vaquero Martín: “6% of patients admitted after trauma have fractures in the region of the knee.

These have a greater incidence in two moments of life: in young people who suffer a high energy accident (traffic, sports, labor) or, at the other end, in elderly osteoporotic who experience a casual fall. They are usually complex fractures and, like any joint fracture, require an accurate reduction of the Fragments “[II]

These have a greater incidence in two moments of life: in young people who suffer a high energy accident (traffic, sports, labor) or, at the other end, in elderly osteoporotic who experience a casual fall. They are usually complex fractures and, like any joint fracture, require an accurate reduction of the Fragments “[II]

Patellar Tendinitis, also called the jumper’s knee, is a common pathology in sports requiring continuous jumps with the corresponding overexertion of the patellar tendon.

These continuous jumps cause microtrauma, especially if the footwear is inadequate and does not allow to adequately cushion the impact of the foot on the ground. This injury may also occur from a direct impact against the patellar tendon.

The pain in these cases focuses on the anterior part of the knee and is often accompanied by a feeling of weakness in the joint.

Risk Factors

Among the factors that may accentuate the risk of knee problems, consider:

The overweight. An obese or overweight person is at increased risk of knee injury even in activities that do not require a great deal of effort like walking or dancing.

Sport. There are sports whose practice incurs an increased risk of knee injury. They are those that by their dynamic of jumps or trots require to the knees the continuous absorption of impacts, like the basketball or the football.

Lack of preparation or prior injury. Insufficient training, inadequate footwear or a well-cured lesion is another important factor in knee injuries.

Preventing Knee injuries

Avoid overweight. Keeping the right weight is the first and best resource we have to protect our knees. Overweight people should take precautions in exercising or sporting activity that they choose to practice.

Proper training. It is advisable to follow a training and know the technique of sport that is practiced to avoid all kinds of injuries, also those of knee. A correct application of the technique that incorporates biomechanical concepts can be very useful to avoid injuries.

Use common sense. People who suffer from chronic pain, repetitive injuries, or arthrosis must carefully assess the choice of physical activity they are going to practice. E8sport.

To prevent injury or improve your recovery it is advisable to know the services of E8sport, an application proven by many athletes that prove very good results.

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[i] Rev.int.med.cienc.act.fís.deporte – vol. 8 – número 29 – marzo 2008 – ISSN: 1577-0354 Ramos Álvarez, J.J.; López-Silvarrey F.J.; Segovia Martínez, J.C.; Martínez Melen, H.; Legido Arce, J.C. (2008). Rehabilitación del paciente con lesión del ligamento cruzado anterior de la rodilla (LCA). Revisión. Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y el Deporte vol. 8 (29) pp. 62-92 Http://cdeporte.rediris.es/revista/revista29/artLCA66.htm

[ii] Javier Vaquero Martín, MD, PhD Jefe de Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédico y Traumatología. Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón. Madrid. España.

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